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Ten things you should avoid in a powerlifting gym (part 1)

Posted by Marie Curtis on
Ten things you should avoid in a powerlifting gym (part 1)

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With the increasing popularity of the fitness lifestyle, it has become more and more relevant to revisit the fundamentals of fitness. Here is some helpful advice about things that you should avoid in a powerlifting gym in order to not only maximize your success in the gym but also tick off as few people as you can.

1. Use a bar but do not know its purpose

Remember that not all weightlifting bars are created equally. You don’t want to bench or squat with a deadlift bar for instance and there are bars of various quality which shouldn’t be used with chains or for other things. So make certain to ask someone who works there or somebody else who doesn’t seem too busy to elucidate which bar is that purpose as there are usually many various bars.

2. Get Too Close To Someone Lifting

Keep a couple of feet faraway from anyone who is lifting heavy weight or any weight for that matter. Be observant and conscious of the space around you because accidents can and do happen, and you don’t want to be the cause. Not keeping your distance is additionally an honest thanks to getting yelled at.

3. Talk Someone’s Ear Off

Some people like to talk while others don’t. It is normal because we are all different.  But remember that a lot of people within the powerlifting gym try to urge in their workout so that they can leave soon and keep it up with the rest of their day. Not everyone wants too or has the time to speak for an hour between exercises but sometimes the person being held hostage doesn’t want to return off as rude by cutting that person off or telling them that they’d like better to train without interruption.

4. Complain If Someone Is Taking Longer Between Sets

It’s a powerlifting gym and powerlifting usually involves longer rest periods since the main target tends to get on strength. So, thereupon being said, don’t complain and if anything you’ll probably even ask to figure in if you’ll hang with the person lifting as it’d be annoying to require off and replace the weights counting on the strength differences.

But in many cases, there should be several different areas open with the equipment you would like.

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Top Tips for Weight Lifting Beginners

Posted by Marie Curtis on
Top Tips for Weight Lifting Beginners

Want to make the best use of weightlifting gear that is gathering dust in your basement and obtain in better shape? Here are seven top tips for weight lifting beginners.

1. Choose a goal

Firstly, you must make clear that what you want to achieve through weight lifting. Do you want to slim down, bulk up, or get more defined? Once having known well your goal, set a time-frame and attempt to achieve it as specific as possible.

2. Keep the proper attitude

Once you’ve set up a goal, keep focused thereon. Post it on your wall or set it on your phone alarm to assist you retain your goal in mind. Try to find someone to figure out with to assist keep you focused and accountable.

3. Know your limits

Start light. Remember, even Arnold Schwarzenegger had to start out somewhere! Lifting heavy weights with fewer repetitions helps you build muscle size and mass, whereas lifting lighter weights with more reps tones muscles.

4. Keep increasing the load

Although you’ll need to begin with lighter weights, don’t grind to a halt during a routine where you retain lifting an equivalent amount. Gradually increase the quantity you lift. Try working towards adding 10 pounds every month to your bench presses.

5. Don’t overdo it

Don’t lift a day. You would like a minimum of two days of rest to permit your muscles to heal. Beginners should try lifting every other day. Also, confirm to urge enough sleep, because without adequate rest you won’t build muscle.

6. Keep proper posture

If you’re doing many lifting, but using poor technique, you’re wasting some time. Ask your training partner to critique your technique, or compute ahead of a mirror.

7. Practice proper nutrition

Remember the GIGO principle: Garbage in, garbage out! Drinking a whey protein shake right after understanding helps your body build muscle (without enough protein you can’t build muscle mass) but nutritional supplements won’t replace eating right and doing the diligence of doing the lifting itself.

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The history of powerlifting

Posted by Marie Curtis on
The history of powerlifting

It all started with the International Powerlifting Federation. the game originated from Weightlifting where the “odd lifts” then became recognized and put into a special format.

The first “genuine” National meet for powerlifting was held in 1964 at the York Barbell Company within the US and therefore the progression began from there within the USA and UK then began to develop in other countries.

In the UK, the first powerlifting federation was BAWLA – British Amateur Weightlifting Association and from that emerged one man to start out the start of the powerlifting revolution within the UK. David Carter.

David Carter left BAWLA and started a replacement federation named British Powerlifting Organization – an “equipped” federation that allowed lifters to wear single-ply equipment and was connected with the planet Powerlifting Congress – who we are affiliated with in the present. He transformed powerlifting within the UK taking it new levels and provided lifts with choice of which federation they lifted in and decided to make a supportive and inspiring environment which is what we learned from him. During this point, other UK federations began to emerge from Davis Carter’s first steps.

The British Powerlifting Organization then made a choice to maneuver far-away from the WPC and that they joined the planet Powerlifting Federation. Thereupon move, the lifters who wanted to remain with the BPC formed a replacement federation by the name of the BPC – British Powerlifting Congress.

The sport had another great breakthrough with the couple Brian and Vanessa Batcheldor heading to make the competitions spectacular and hosted in venues like the NEC and the BIC in Bournemouth. Vanessa Batcheldor was one of the simplest female powerlifters we had squatting more than 200kg at 60kg in bodyweight which remains a record nowadays.

Since then British Powerlifting Union was formed, along with the planet Powerlifting Congress as our administration. It had the stress of bringing back the element of “run by powerlifters, for powerlifters” and the element of support that might be lost at elite levels. Our aim is to progress the game and supply opportunity at the amateur level during structured thanks to encouraging new lifters to the game and supply a grass roots platform in order to develop from to national and international competition at the elite level.

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Weight lifting better for heart health than running, a new study finds

Posted by Marie Curtis on
Weight lifting better for heart health than running, a new study finds

Lifting weights is better for heart health than running or walking, new research has found.

Looking at the health records of more than 4,000 people, scientists have concluded that static activities like weight lifting or press-ups have a greater effect on reducing the risk of developing heart disease than an equivalent amount of dynamic exercise like running, walking or cycling.

weightlifting

The result of the research challenges commonly held assumption that so-called “cardiovascular” pursuits such as running are of the greatest benefit to the heart.

However, it backs up previous studies suggesting that heavy static exercise gives the circulatory system a better workout due to more intense oxygen expenditure.

The Chief Medical Officer for England recommends that adults spend at least 150 minutes on the moderate-intensity physical activity each week, comprising a mixture of static and dynamic activity.

Researchers analyzed cardiovascular risk factors, including overweight, diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol, as a function of self-reported dynamic and/or static activity in 4,086 American adults that took part in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2005 to 2006.

The researchers then adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, and smoking and stratified by age, over 45 or 21 to 44 years old.

Totally, 25 per cent of older and 36 per cent of younger adults engaged in static activity, and 21 per cent of older and 28 per cent of younger adults engaged in dynamic activity.

It was found that taking part in either type of activity was associated with 30 – 70 per cent lower rates of cardiovascular disease risk factors; however, associations were strongest for static activity and in youth.

Prof Smith said one interesting takeaway was that both dynamic and static activity was almost as popular in older people as younger ones.

General

Three essential weightlifting moves that beginners should do

Posted by Marie Curtis on
Three essential weightlifting moves that beginners should do

As a beginner to weight lifting, the best way to start is with a combination of functional exercises which mimic movements that you use in daily life and compound lifts. Learning these following movement patterns, including squat, push, pull, hip hinge, and hip extension, is key for establishing a foundation that can help you build more complex exercises to get comfortable with powerlifting and progress safely when you become stronger.

1. Goblet Squats

  • Hold a weight at your chest in two hands, stand with your feet slightly wider than hip-width apart and your elbows close to your body.
  • Bend your knees while dropping your butt back and down to lower. Make sure to keep your chest high and core tight.
  • Push your knees out and keep the weight in your heels.
  • Squeeze your glutes at the top and push through your heels to stand back up.

2. Shoulder Presses

  • Kneel with your back straight and core tight or stand up with your feet a little bit wider than hip-width apart. Hold a dumbbell in each hand and raise your arms up to shoulder-height so the weights are in the air. Rotate your wrists to make your palms face forward.
  • Press the pair of dumbbells overhead while keeping your elbows facing forward during the press.
  • Once your arms are fully extended, pause at the top. After that, return the weights slowly to starting position.

3. Basic Stiff-Leg Deadlifts

  • Stand with knees slightly bent, feet hip-width apart, holding a pair of dumbbells in your two hands.
  • Bend your knees slightly and hinge at your hips when you lower your body. Keep thinking about pushing your butt back.
  • Hold the pair of dumbbells close to your legs when you descend. Pull back on your shoulder blades and remember not to let your back arch.
  • Push through your heels to stand up straight while keeping your core tight. Keep the weights close to your shins when pulling.
General

Five Significant Health Benefits of Weightlifting

Posted by Marie Curtis on
Five Significant Health Benefits of Weightlifting

Weightlifting seems to be a daunting thing at first, but like anything else, when you give it time and practice it regularly, it will pay off for the rest of your life. Nowadays, many people are practicing weightlifting as a way to keep fit and healthy because it has a lot of benefits for adults of all ages and genders. Here are five health benefits of weightlifting when you make it a part of your workout routine.

1. Injury prevention

Weightlifting is one of the most effective ways to increase bone density and build muscles mass. It is important to build stronger bones to reduce the risk of fractures. This is the reason why if runners skip on strength training activities, they can end up injuring their knees and other body parts as well.

 2. Healthier heart

A recent study has shown that spending less than an hour on weightlifting each week could reduce the risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke by 40 to 70 percent. This might boost your cardiovascular health better than running. However, for optimal physical fitness, it is recommended that you should perform both types of exercise, for example, strength training and aerobic activity.

3. Burn calories

Technically, a cardio session burns more calories than a weightlifting one. However, weightlifting can help build muscle, meaning that you will burn calories even while at rest. Following a high-intensity weightlifting session can be considered as the afterburn effect.

4. Diabetes management

Particularly, those who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should include weightlifting or some other forms of strength exercises in their routine. Experts advise that you should tone your muscles in order to better control blood glucose levels.

5. Mental wellbeing

While it is clear that aerobic exercise has certain mental health benefits, the literature shows that weightlifting can also lift your spirits. According to a meta-analysis taken in 2017, weightlifting is linked to a significant anxiety reduction.